ANOTHER S.A.L. WRECK AT HAMLET...1901

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Bruce Osburn
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ANOTHER S.A.L. WRECK AT HAMLET...1901

Postby Bruce Osburn » Sat July 6, 2013, 4:33 pm

FROM: THE TIMES, Richmond Va., June 18, 1901.

PASSENGER TRAIN DITCHED NEAR HAMLET.
SEVERAL PERSONS INJURED.
CARS ROLLED DOWN EMBANKMENT AND UPSET IN A POND.

RALEIGH, N.C., June 17. — Particulars were received here this morning of a right serious wreck which occurred about 12:30 o'clock this morning on the Seaboard Air Line between Hamlet and Rockingham, at a point one mile from the former place. It was occasioned by a washout. The engine and two cars — express and mail — had passed over when the track gave way, causing the first and second-class day coaches and two Pullman cars to roll down an embankment into a pond, which spread out on either side. A day coach and a Pullman overturned. There were a number of women and children on the Pullman, but fortunately no one was killed or seriously injured. A number of the men were painfully bruised.

P.B.Rogers, a clerk in the Raleigh office of the Southern Express Company, who was traveling as a passenger, was painfully cut over the left eye, so much so that several stitches had to be taken in dressing the wound. Conductor J.B. Hogan was also considerably bruised and shaken up. Two passengers, whose names could not be ascertained here, received internal injuries which were not considered serious and were left at Hamlet in care of a physician.

SEARCHING FOR HER CHILD.
A relief train was sent out from Hamlet to rescue the victims of the wreck. One lady passenger was found wading waist-deep in the water of the pond searching for her four-year-old son, whom she believed had been hurled into the water when the car overturned. She was well nigh frantic. It was soon ascertained that the child had been found by the engineer and carried into the express car, which was standing on the track out of harm's way.

The embankment where the accident occurred is only about 8 feet high, and this in a large measure accounts for there having been no fatal or more serious injuries sustained by passengers or trainmen.
Bruce Osburn
--We live so long as we are remembered... old German adage.

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